Tagged: grief

Consequences and Coping With Them (Episode 20 of Rahxephon)

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After the revelations of episode 19 of Rahxephon, the expectation – the anticipated progression of a traditional narrative which has just reached its tragic mid-point climax and is surely beginning its turnaround to eventual victory – would be that there would be some focus on Ayato’s response to the tragedy he has experienced. It would be catharsis, after the fight that has just occurred, a clear sign that the story is unlikely to go lower and will begin its narrative upturn. Losing someone close to them is usually the catalyst for a protagonist to toughen up and get some vengeance, but this is shown in narrative terms by showing how they respond to their grief – it is their story, and they response matters. There is no catharsis in episode 20 of Rahxephon. It glosses over, in explicit terms, Ayato’s response to episode 19. He has got over it. How and why is not shown.

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Talking to Women in Episode 38 of Eureka Seven

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While the A-plot of Eureka Seven episode 38 continues the story of Dewey’s coup d’etat and how it has put Stoner and Holland on the back foot, the more interesting story is the B-plot of Renton and Eureka trying to reconcile after an argument. In a recent article about Captain Earth I discussed how a real high point of the series was its treatment of the alien child Teppei’s relationship with his biological father, who he had never seen in his life. Teppei was presented as so alien he could not comprehend why it mattered that he met his father, and why this man was so attached to him. It was a strong episode, approaching a stock mecha plotline (of the alien prince, or the half-alien half-human such as Eiji from Layzner – with whom Teppei’s father shared a name) from an interesting, more human perspective. Eureka Seven 38 approaches the same plot with the benefit of almost 40 previous episodes to build up its concept of a relationship between the human and the alien; it is by now the most important theme of the story, and that finally it comes to the foreground in plain terms continues to drive on a steadily-building sense of tension.

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Music and Misdirection – Episode 10 of Rahxephon

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As of episode 9 of Rahxephon, it seems that the established traditional super-robot arc is coming to an end; the mysteries about the supernatural, anti-technological aspects are coming to the fore and it is reveals there is something significant about Quan as well as Reika. In some ways the dream episode just seen could be unsatisfying; there is a mixture of pouring new mysteries onto those that are still not fully known, and almost-straightforward expository revelations. Yet this ambiguity – the way in which simply explaining something has been subverted by the cast – is ultimately the driving force of the plot.

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Closure – Episode 28 of Eureka Seven

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Note: This article is also available at Super Fanicom HERE

Episode 27 of Eureka Seven was divided into two sections; the tense buildup to the battle which provided the exposition that will become key in the series’ latter half, and the battle between Holland and Charles itself, resulting in the latter’s death and his wife’s escape. Episode 28 seems to continue this story right from the start, but moving backwards in the narrative to contextualise what has happened. It begins with Ray in hospital, telling Charles she is infertile because of “that phenomenon” – yet this becomes the moment at which he proposes to her.

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Battle of Wits – Episode 27 of Eureka Seven (B-Part)

Ray and Charles' battle with Holland is a fight of equals, quite unlike Amuro fighting Ramba Ral.

Ray and Charles’ battle with Holland is a fight of equals, quite unlike Amuro fighting Ramba Ral.

Note: This article is also available at Super Fanicom HERE

The “A-Part” of episode 27 of Eureka Seven was dense with worldbuilding, using the moments of peace immediately prior to Ray and Charles’ apparent suicide attack to build tension while also – through snatched conversations – lay down the groundwork for the conflicts that will define the second half of the series. As Holland continually moved to shut himself off from distractions and turn the Gekko into a battlefield, the other characters looked forwards to the future – calling into question the Gekkostate’s future relevance.

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