Tagged: authority

Authority, Experience and Redemption; Axel Thurston in Eureka Seven

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Dominic’s response to the attack of the Coralians in Eureka Seven introduced again the tension between authority and expertise – and the power of authority and rank – in the military drama plot which the series circles around. Yet the core story is often far from the military – even if the tension emerges when morality clashes with utilitarianism (as with Holland’s “kidnapping” of the Voderak woman early in the series, or Renton’s disobedience of Ray and Charles to do what he believes is right). The Gekko’s response – powerless as they were to really stop Dewey’s atrocities – provides this human focus.

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Rahxephon Episode 6 as a Super Robot Anime

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The fifth episode of Rahxephon built up to a series of guarded revelations that both explained more of what the future holds for the story and also explained how powerless Ayato actually is within it; the conspiratorial confusion that defines the action is given a more cruel, personal aspect in how it is denying him apparently simple answers to genuine and reasonable questions. It is clear he is being used to the audience, and his realisation of this is the main dramatic conflict within the episode. Yet it ends with some measure of harmony; while his life with Megumi and her uncle is a strange one based on necessity over genuine friendship, the way it is visually framed in the cliches of young love suggests there is hope for the future. Episode six begins some time after this, immediately revealing its core conflict. The personal is apparently being set aside for the human-versus-alien war that one might expect from a mecha animé.

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Turn-A Gundam – Status and Power

The scene where Dianna (in the persona of Kihel) visits the Heim family grave is a blunt recapitulation of what the character-switch means; both sides are seeing the difficulties and tragedies that the enemy must deal with first-hand.

The scene where Dianna (in the persona of Kihel) visits the Heim family grave is a blunt recapitulation of what the character-switch means; both sides are seeing the difficulties and tragedies that the enemy must deal with first-hand.

The central plot conceit of much of Turn-A Gundam is that two central characters – the victim of war Kihel Heim and the leader of the invading Moonrace Dianna Soriel – switch places, taking advantage of their similarity of appearance to experience life from another perspective. The lonely queen of the moon initially sees this as a joke stemming from an emerging friendship with a confidante of the leader of earth forces, but as the events of the war develop – and Moonrace and Earth Militia forces both escalate the conflict ignorant of attempts at peace – the switch becomes a much more significant thing as Kihel, a civilian, ends up having to do more than look like her counterpart but also fulfil Dianna’s role as a military leader.

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